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Mamoru Tsukada

2012/12
Groupshow
«Wait a moment, I'm still thinking ...»
Photographic Methods on Inner Composure
With:
Karina Beltrán, Roger Eberhard, Marisa Maza,
Stefan Panhans, Vadim Schäffler, Mamoru Tsukada
01.12.2012−05.01.2013


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Mamoru Tsukada


Mamoru Tsukada: Tears in Rain, 2010
Archival Digital Print on Aluminum Sheet mounted on Aluminum board, 30 x 30 cm, Ed. 3/7




Mamoru Tsukada: Sensus Communis, 2010
Archival Digital Print on Aluminum Sheet mounted on Aluminum board, 30 x 30 cm, Ed. 3/7




Mamoru Tsukada: Can love be materialized?, 2010
Archival Digital Print on Aluminum Sheet mounted on Aluminum board, 30 x 30 cm, Ed. 3/7

 

Born in Japan, 1962 and lives and in Berlin since 2008

He studied photography at International Center of Photography in New York, 1991-92. 2002-2005, he studied art theory and history at Art Studium/ Kinki University, Tokyo. He worked as a portrait photographer for Forbes, Business Week and Time magazine from 1995-2005.

In 2011, by the nuclear accident in Japan, he has organized an exhibition with 19 artists, “Fukushima- Opening Doors with Compassion” in Cologne.

Since 2003, he has been at solo shows at Tomio Koyama Gallery in Tokyo and numerous international group shows in New York and Berlin.

In 2010 and 2011, he has participated a touring group show in Europe, “Islands Never Found” (curated by Lorand Hegyi), in Palazzo Ducale, Genoa, The State Museum of Contemporary Art, Thessaloniki, and Musee D’art Moderne, St, Etienne. He has also participated an International Biennale in Poznan, 2008.

The reviews of his work were written by many international critics and have appeared at the numerous art magazine and publications, such as Frieze magazine, Mediation Biennale in Poznan, and The Emerging Japanese 100 Artist.

He has published a photography book in 2002, which he took photographs of blind people, “The Fact that We Are Compelled Look Out Beyond Our Sensible Representations”.


For further rmation